Learning advanced R

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Learning advanced R

Nik Tuzov

Hello:

Could you please suggest the best way to become an "advanced" R programmer.
I went through "R for dummies" by de Vries and Meys and I can see two ways
to proceed:

1) Get a more advanced textbook. E.g. could you recommend Gentleman,
"R for Bioinformatics"?

2) Because textbooks are limited and become obsolete fast, I can focus on learning state-of-the-art packages,
but for that I need to find a list of most useful general purpose packages (foreach, doParallel, etc) that is
updated in real time. Does such list exist?

Your recommendations are very welcome.

Thanks,
Nik

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Re: Learning advanced R

mark leeds
See Hadley's advanced R along Thomas Mailund's books. I haven't gone
through them carefully but they both
seem  (from what I've looked at ) to be the best ones for that. Mentions of
others are appreciated.




On Tue, Mar 13, 2018 at 5:26 PM, Nik Tuzov <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> Hello:
>
> Could you please suggest the best way to become an "advanced" R programmer.
> I went through "R for dummies" by de Vries and Meys and I can see two ways
> to proceed:
>
> 1) Get a more advanced textbook. E.g. could you recommend Gentleman,
> "R for Bioinformatics"?
>
> 2) Because textbooks are limited and become obsolete fast, I can focus on
> learning state-of-the-art packages,
> but for that I need to find a list of most useful general purpose packages
> (foreach, doParallel, etc) that is
> updated in real time. Does such list exist?
>
> Your recommendations are very welcome.
>
> Thanks,
> Nik
>
> ______________________________________________
> [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/
> posting-guide.html
> and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
>

        [[alternative HTML version deleted]]

______________________________________________
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Re: Learning advanced R

Bert Gunter-2
See here for some suggestions:

https://www.rstudio.com/online-learning/#R

Cheers,
Bert



Bert Gunter

"The trouble with having an open mind is that people keep coming along and
sticking things into it."
-- Opus (aka Berkeley Breathed in his "Bloom County" comic strip )

On Tue, Mar 13, 2018 at 2:31 PM, Mark Leeds <[hidden email]> wrote:

> See Hadley's advanced R along Thomas Mailund's books. I haven't gone
> through them carefully but they both
> seem  (from what I've looked at ) to be the best ones for that. Mentions of
> others are appreciated.
>
>
>
>
> On Tue, Mar 13, 2018 at 5:26 PM, Nik Tuzov <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
> >
> > Hello:
> >
> > Could you please suggest the best way to become an "advanced" R
> programmer.
> > I went through "R for dummies" by de Vries and Meys and I can see two
> ways
> > to proceed:
> >
> > 1) Get a more advanced textbook. E.g. could you recommend Gentleman,
> > "R for Bioinformatics"?
> >
> > 2) Because textbooks are limited and become obsolete fast, I can focus on
> > learning state-of-the-art packages,
> > but for that I need to find a list of most useful general purpose
> packages
> > (foreach, doParallel, etc) that is
> > updated in real time. Does such list exist?
> >
> > Your recommendations are very welcome.
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Nik
> >
> > ______________________________________________
> > [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
> > https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> > PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/
> > posting-guide.html
> > and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
> >
>
>         [[alternative HTML version deleted]]
>
> ______________________________________________
> [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/
> posting-guide.html
> and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
>

        [[alternative HTML version deleted]]

______________________________________________
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Re: Learning advanced R

Rich Shepard
In reply to this post by mark leeds
On Tue, 13 Mar 2018, Mark Leeds wrote:

> See Hadley's advanced R

   +1 A very well writte, highly useful book. Recommended.

Rich

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Re: Learning advanced R

Eric Berger
Bert's suggestion is good as a pointer to a variety of resources.
Sticking to the book format there are two of Hadley Wickham's books, which
have the advantage that they are freely available.
You can either read them online or download the source from github and
create your own copy (which you can then print, if desired.)
1. "R for Data Science"
     online: http://r4ds.had.co.nz/
     github: https://github.com/hadley/r4ds
2. "Advanced R"
     online: https://adv-r.hadley.nz/
     github: https://github.com/hadley/adv-r

Best,
Eric



On Wed, Mar 14, 2018 at 12:13 AM, Rich Shepard <[hidden email]>
wrote:

> On Tue, 13 Mar 2018, Mark Leeds wrote:
>
> See Hadley's advanced R
>>
>
>   +1 A very well writte, highly useful book. Recommended.
>
> Rich
>
>
> ______________________________________________
> [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posti
> ng-guide.html
> and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
>

        [[alternative HTML version deleted]]

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Re: Learning advanced R

barry rowlingson
In reply to this post by Rich Shepard
Depending on your application, I'm not sure there's much point in being an
"advanced R programmer" these days. Become an adequate R programmer, and
learn C++ and Rcpp. Do basic data mashing in R, then do all your intensive
stuff in C++ with Rcpp. Eventually you'll probably get to the point where
you can express yourself in C++ as fast as you can in interpreted R, with
the bonus of C++ speed, type-safety etc.

</controversial>

On Wed, Mar 14, 2018 at 8:13 AM, Eric Berger <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Bert's suggestion is good as a pointer to a variety of resources.
> Sticking to the book format there are two of Hadley Wickham's books, which
> have the advantage that they are freely available.
> You can either read them online or download the source from github and
> create your own copy (which you can then print, if desired.)
> 1. "R for Data Science"
>      online: http://r4ds.had.co.nz/
>      github: https://github.com/hadley/r4ds
> 2. "Advanced R"
>      online: https://adv-r.hadley.nz/
>      github: https://github.com/hadley/adv-r
>
> Best,
> Eric
>
>
>
> On Wed, Mar 14, 2018 at 12:13 AM, Rich Shepard <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
> > On Tue, 13 Mar 2018, Mark Leeds wrote:
> >
> > See Hadley's advanced R
> >>
> >
> >   +1 A very well writte, highly useful book. Recommended.
> >
> > Rich
> >
> >
> > ______________________________________________
> > [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
> > https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> > PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posti
> > ng-guide.html
> > and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
> >
>
>         [[alternative HTML version deleted]]
>
> ______________________________________________
> [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/
> posting-guide.html
> and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
>

        [[alternative HTML version deleted]]

______________________________________________
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Re: Learning advanced R

Rich Shepard
On Wed, 14 Mar 2018, Barry Rowlingson wrote:

> Depending on your application, I'm not sure there's much point in being an
> "advanced R programmer" these days. Become an adequate R programmer, and
> learn C++ and Rcpp. Do basic data mashing in R, then do all your intensive
> stuff in C++ with Rcpp. Eventually you'll probably get to the point where
> you can express yourself in C++ as fast as you can in interpreted R, with
> the bonus of C++ speed, type-safety etc.

Barry,

   Allow me to offer an alternative to C++: Python. Compiled languages are
faster than interpreted ones, but unless you're doing time-critical
computations it really does not matter. R and Python provide proven
abilities in a broad range of applications and with today's hardware the
analytical/modeling code is not likely to be the limiting factor.

Regards,

Rich

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Re: Learning advanced R

Duncan Murdoch-2
On 14/03/2018 12:07 PM, Rich Shepard wrote:

> On Wed, 14 Mar 2018, Barry Rowlingson wrote:
>
>> Depending on your application, I'm not sure there's much point in being an
>> "advanced R programmer" these days. Become an adequate R programmer, and
>> learn C++ and Rcpp. Do basic data mashing in R, then do all your intensive
>> stuff in C++ with Rcpp. Eventually you'll probably get to the point where
>> you can express yourself in C++ as fast as you can in interpreted R, with
>> the bonus of C++ speed, type-safety etc.
>
> Barry,
>
>     Allow me to offer an alternative to C++: Python. Compiled languages are
> faster than interpreted ones, but unless you're doing time-critical
> computations it really does not matter. R and Python provide proven
> abilities in a broad range of applications and with today's hardware the
> analytical/modeling code is not likely to be the limiting factor.
>

I'm all for learning more languages and using the one that's best for
each job, but for people who don't know Python, it would be helpful to
list the aspects in which it excels.  When should an R user choose to
write something in Python instead?

Duncan Murdoch

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Fwd: Learning advanced R

Eric Berger
In reply to this post by Eric Berger
Hi Albrecht,
I am forwarding your reply to the full group.

It's been a while since I did this and I don't remember the details. Maybe
someone else can comment. (I am a bit busy at the moment.)
If no one supplies the information in a few days I will try to take a look.

In the meantime you can start your reading on-line. :-)

Regards,
Eric


Dear Eric,

I downloaded the material from   https://github.com/hadley/adv-r as a zip
file and decompressed it.  But, how to build the book from this? The
directory book contains a R-script buildbook.R. I downloaded all packages
that are required, but the script does not run. Is there an additional
script required?

Best,
Albrecht

--
  Albrecht Kauffmann
  [hidden email]

Am Mi, 14. Mär 2018, um 09:13, schrieb Eric Berger:

> Bert's suggestion is good as a pointer to a variety of resources.
> Sticking to the book format there are two of Hadley Wickham's books, which
> have the advantage that they are freely available.
> You can either read them online or download the source from github and
> create your own copy (which you can then print, if desired.)
> 1. "R for Data Science"
>      online: http://r4ds.had.co.nz/
>      github: https://github.com/hadley/r4ds
> 2. "Advanced R"
>      online: https://adv-r.hadley.nz/
>      github: https://github.com/hadley/adv-r
>
> Best,
> Eric
>
>
>
> On Wed, Mar 14, 2018 at 12:13 AM, Rich Shepard <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
> > On Tue, 13 Mar 2018, Mark Leeds wrote:
> >
> > See Hadley's advanced R
> >>
> >
> >   +1 A very well writte, highly useful book. Recommended.
> >
> > Rich
> >
> >
> > ______________________________________________
> > [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
> > https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> > PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posti
> > ng-guide.html
> > and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
> >
>
>       [[alternative HTML version deleted]]
>
> ______________________________________________
> [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/
posting-guide.html
> and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.

        [[alternative HTML version deleted]]

______________________________________________
[hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
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Re: Fwd: Learning advanced R

Jeff Newmiller
I recommend reading it directly via the website, or buying the book.

If you are trying to build a PDF, then the "obvious" question is whether you have LaTeX installed, which is an operating-system-dependent procedure handled outside of R.
--
Sent from my phone. Please excuse my brevity.

On March 14, 2018 9:39:53 AM PDT, Eric Berger <[hidden email]> wrote:

>Hi Albrecht,
>I am forwarding your reply to the full group.
>
>It's been a while since I did this and I don't remember the details.
>Maybe
>someone else can comment. (I am a bit busy at the moment.)
>If no one supplies the information in a few days I will try to take a
>look.
>
>In the meantime you can start your reading on-line. :-)
>
>Regards,
>Eric
>
>
>Dear Eric,
>
>I downloaded the material from   https://github.com/hadley/adv-r as a
>zip
>file and decompressed it.  But, how to build the book from this? The
>directory book contains a R-script buildbook.R. I downloaded all
>packages
>that are required, but the script does not run. Is there an additional
>script required?
>
>Best,
>Albrecht
>
>--
>  Albrecht Kauffmann
>  [hidden email]
>
>Am Mi, 14. Mär 2018, um 09:13, schrieb Eric Berger:
>> Bert's suggestion is good as a pointer to a variety of resources.
>> Sticking to the book format there are two of Hadley Wickham's books,
>which
>> have the advantage that they are freely available.
>> You can either read them online or download the source from github
>and
>> create your own copy (which you can then print, if desired.)
>> 1. "R for Data Science"
>>      online: http://r4ds.had.co.nz/
>>      github: https://github.com/hadley/r4ds
>> 2. "Advanced R"
>>      online: https://adv-r.hadley.nz/
>>      github: https://github.com/hadley/adv-r
>>
>> Best,
>> Eric
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Mar 14, 2018 at 12:13 AM, Rich Shepard
><[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>>
>> > On Tue, 13 Mar 2018, Mark Leeds wrote:
>> >
>> > See Hadley's advanced R
>> >>
>> >
>> >   +1 A very well writte, highly useful book. Recommended.
>> >
>> > Rich
>> >
>> >
>> > ______________________________________________
>> > [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
>> > https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
>> > PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posti
>> > ng-guide.html
>> > and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
>> >
>>
>>       [[alternative HTML version deleted]]
>>
>> ______________________________________________
>> [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
>> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
>> PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/
>posting-guide.html
>> and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
>
> [[alternative HTML version deleted]]
>
>______________________________________________
>[hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
>https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
>PLEASE do read the posting guide
>http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
>and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.

______________________________________________
[hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
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Re: Learning advanced R

Rich Shepard
In reply to this post by Duncan Murdoch-2
On Wed, 14 Mar 2018, Duncan Murdoch wrote:

> I'm all for learning more languages and using the one that's best for each
> job, but for people who don't know Python, it would be helpful to list the
> aspects in which it excels. When should an R user choose to write
> something in Python instead?

Duncan,

   "Best" is subjective, but my view is the language most comfortable and
familiar to the developer/analyst should be the one used.

   In my environmental consulting business I use both R and Python. While
Python has support for many statistical models I'm more comfortable with the
ones available in R. For spatial analyses (separate from spatial statistics)
I've used GRASS for > 20 years and it heavily uses Python. I also use Python
(along with emacs, awk, sed, and grep) for cleaning and organizing data. For
writing, I use LaTeX (a markup language) and the LyX GUI front end.

   Python has a lot of support for scientific and financial analyses, as does
R. Considering there are a gazillion programming languages available (and
used for essential applications, such as GnuCash (written in guile, a scheme
variant) which I use for business and personal bookkeeping, picking the
"best" one is strictly a personal matter. I prefer emacs, my system and
network admin friends prefer vi. In linux, at least, there are so many
options for doing a task that sometimes it's difficult to decide which to
use in a given situation.

   If the languages you know do all you need then learn a new one only if
it's to scratch an itch. :-)

Best regards,

Rich

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Re: Fwd: Learning advanced R

Albrecht Kauffmann-2
In reply to this post by Jeff Newmiller
Dear Jeff,

Latex is also required for the R-manuals in the base R installation, and for this it works fine on my PC.

Best,
Albrecht

--
  Albrecht Kauffmann
  [hidden email]

Am Mi, 14. Mär 2018, um 17:50, schrieb Jeff Newmiller:

> I recommend reading it directly via the website, or buying the book.
>
> If you are trying to build a PDF, then the "obvious" question is whether
> you have LaTeX installed, which is an operating-system-dependent
> procedure handled outside of R.
> --
> Sent from my phone. Please excuse my brevity.
>
> On March 14, 2018 9:39:53 AM PDT, Eric Berger <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >Hi Albrecht,
> >I am forwarding your reply to the full group.
> >
> >It's been a while since I did this and I don't remember the details.
> >Maybe
> >someone else can comment. (I am a bit busy at the moment.)
> >If no one supplies the information in a few days I will try to take a
> >look.
> >
> >In the meantime you can start your reading on-line. :-)
> >
> >Regards,
> >Eric
> >
> >
> >Dear Eric,
> >
> >I downloaded the material from   https://github.com/hadley/adv-r as a
> >zip
> >file and decompressed it.  But, how to build the book from this? The
> >directory book contains a R-script buildbook.R. I downloaded all
> >packages
> >that are required, but the script does not run. Is there an additional
> >script required?
> >
> >Best,
> >Albrecht
> >
> >--
> >  Albrecht Kauffmann
> >  [hidden email]
> >
> >Am Mi, 14. Mär 2018, um 09:13, schrieb Eric Berger:
> >> Bert's suggestion is good as a pointer to a variety of resources.
> >> Sticking to the book format there are two of Hadley Wickham's books,
> >which
> >> have the advantage that they are freely available.
> >> You can either read them online or download the source from github
> >and
> >> create your own copy (which you can then print, if desired.)
> >> 1. "R for Data Science"
> >>      online: http://r4ds.had.co.nz/
> >>      github: https://github.com/hadley/r4ds
> >> 2. "Advanced R"
> >>      online: https://adv-r.hadley.nz/
> >>      github: https://github.com/hadley/adv-r
> >>
> >> Best,
> >> Eric
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> On Wed, Mar 14, 2018 at 12:13 AM, Rich Shepard
> ><[hidden email]>
> >> wrote:
> >>
> >> > On Tue, 13 Mar 2018, Mark Leeds wrote:
> >> >
> >> > See Hadley's advanced R
> >> >>
> >> >
> >> >   +1 A very well writte, highly useful book. Recommended.
> >> >
> >> > Rich
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > ______________________________________________
> >> > [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
> >> > https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> >> > PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posti
> >> > ng-guide.html
> >> > and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
> >> >
> >>
> >>       [[alternative HTML version deleted]]
> >>
> >> ______________________________________________
> >> [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
> >> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> >> PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/
> >posting-guide.html
> >> and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
> >
> > [[alternative HTML version deleted]]
> >
> >______________________________________________
> >[hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
> >https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> >PLEASE do read the posting guide
> >http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
> >and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
>
> ______________________________________________
> [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
> and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.

______________________________________________
[hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
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Re: Fwd: Learning advanced R

Jeff Newmiller
Nothing you have said tells me you have LaTeX working (a binary install of R does not depend on it), but if you actually know it is installed and available to R then that isn't the problem. Since you have not said what you actually did or what errors you encountered I can only shrug and suggest that that the website is a complete rendering of the book and the for-sale version makes a worthwhile contribution to the author and the community.
--
Sent from my phone. Please excuse my brevity.

On March 14, 2018 9:58:38 AM PDT, Albrecht Kauffmann <[hidden email]> wrote:
>Dear Jeff,
>
>Latex is also required for the R-manuals in the base R installation,
>and for this it works fine on my PC.
>
>Best,
>Albrecht

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Re: Learning advanced R

Spencer Graves-4
In reply to this post by Rich Shepard


On 2018-03-14 11:52, Rich Shepard wrote:

> On Wed, 14 Mar 2018, Duncan Murdoch wrote:
>
>> I'm all for learning more languages and using the one that's best for
>> each
>> job, but for people who don't know Python, it would be helpful to
>> list the
>> aspects in which it excels. When should an R user choose to write
>> something in Python instead?
>
> Duncan,
>
>   "Best" is subjective, but my view is the language most comfortable and
> familiar to the developer/analyst should be the one used.
>
>   In my environmental consulting business I use both R and Python. While
> Python has support for many statistical models I'm more comfortable
> with the
> ones available in R. For spatial analyses (separate from spatial
> statistics)
> I've used GRASS for > 20 years and it heavily uses Python. I also use
> Python
> (along with emacs, awk, sed, and grep) for cleaning and organizing
> data. For
> writing, I use LaTeX (a markup language) and the LyX GUI front end.
>
>   Python has a lot of support for scientific and financial analyses,
> as does
> R. Considering there are a gazillion programming languages available (and
> used for essential applications, such as GnuCash (written in guile, a
> scheme
> variant) which I use for business and personal bookkeeping, picking the
> "best" one is strictly a personal matter. I prefer emacs, my system and
> network admin friends prefer vi. In linux, at least, there are so many
> options for doing a task that sometimes it's difficult to decide which to
> use in a given situation.
>
>   If the languages you know do all you need then learn a new one only if
> it's to scratch an itch. :-)


       My software development productivity increased by a factor of
maybe 30 by using first S-Plus then R, including writing R packages,
then RStudio and writing Rmarkdown vignettes.


             1.  I started writing Fortran in 1963.  I've written
assembly language for multiple machines, Cobol, Lisp, and other
language.  I started using S-Plus in the early 1990s and abandoned it
for R when I needed "debug" for some S-Plus code.  Developing R packages
improved my software development productivity by a factor of 10, because
the discipline of creating unit tests in "\examples" made it so much
easier to debug and maintain -- AND share with others.


             2.  I've also written some Python, though not much.  I used
Emacs until I found RStudio.  Vi and Emacs are not tools you can give to
someone, who is only marginally computer literate and expect them to be
productive in a reasonable period of time.  By contrast, if someone
knows enough to be able to install R and RStudio, I can give them some R
code and be confident that they will get something useful from the
experience in a relatively short period of time.  You can't do that with
vi and Emacs unless they already know those applications.


             3.  Recently, I've started writing RMarkdown vignettes, and
that further increased my productivity.


                   3.1.  Two years ago, I told I client I was going to
prepare and Rmarkdown vignette to document what I did with their data. 
My sales guy said absolutely, we were NOT going to give the client an
Rmarkdown vignette.  I spent a week analyzing the data and 6 months
answering questions from the team mostly by pointing them to certain
lines in the vignette, occasionally by extending it.  In the middle of
that, we learned that the client required our analysis to be
verifiable.  After that, the vignette became a primary deliverable.


                   3.2.  More recently, another client asked me to
explain principal components.  This client was moderately facile with
software but not with R nor vector spaces.  I gave him an Rmarkdown
vignette that included a principal components on some data he gave me
done both with a single command and step by step supplemented with a
simple discussion of a one-dimensional subspace of two-dimensional
space.  He was happy.


             4.  I invite all to review and improve the discussion in
the Wikipedia article on "Software repository".  This a table with a
discussion of "Selected repositories", much of which I wrote 8 years
ago.  It's heavily biased toward CRAN, because that's what I know the
best, and I've so far been unable to find anyone with the expertise and
interest in improving it.  This article averaged 290 views per day over
the past 90 days, over 26,000 in the past 3 months.  If you can improve
that article, an audience that size might be worth talking to.


        Spencer Graves

>
> Best regards,
>
> Rich
>
> ______________________________________________
> [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> PLEASE do read the posting guide
> http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
> and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.

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Re: Fwd: Learning advanced R

Rich Shepard
In reply to this post by Jeff Newmiller
On Wed, 14 Mar 2018, Jeff Newmiller wrote:

> Nothing you have said tells me you have LaTeX working (a binary install of
> R does not depend on it), but if you actually know it is installed and
> available to R then that isn't the problem. Since you have not said what
> you actually did or what errors you encountered I can only shrug and
> suggest that that the website is a complete rendering of the book and the
> for-sale version makes a worthwhile contribution to the author and the
> community.

Jeff,

   Downloading the site as a .zip file and reading the README.md tells us
that pandoc is required. This is a format converter, apparently based on
Haskell given the large number of dependencies to build it. But, pandoc will
convert from markdown to LaTeX. I don't know the exact procedure as I've not
yet taken the time to install all dependencies to pandoc and build it. The
pandoc website has documentation.

Regards,

Rich

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Re: Fwd: Learning advanced R

Albrecht Kauffmann-2
I've found two problems in interpreting adv-r-master/book/build-book.r:

1. All pathes in build-book.r refer to the starting-directory "adv-r-master". However, the script build-book.r is located in the directory "book", which is located in directory "adv-r-master". Therefore, pathes starting at "." are wrong (should start at "..").

2. Some file names have endings "Rmd", but e.g. in the line "chapters <- dir(".", pattern = "\\.rmd$")"  these endings are named "rmd". Therefore, the files (e.g. "base-types.Rmd") cannot be found.

Pandoc I have installed. Maybe there will arise further problems, but still I am experimenting with pathes.

Best,
Albrecht

--
  Albrecht Kauffmann
  [hidden email]

Am Mi, 14. Mär 2018, um 18:56, schrieb Rich Shepard:

> On Wed, 14 Mar 2018, Jeff Newmiller wrote:
>
> > Nothing you have said tells me you have LaTeX working (a binary install of
> > R does not depend on it), but if you actually know it is installed and
> > available to R then that isn't the problem. Since you have not said what
> > you actually did or what errors you encountered I can only shrug and
> > suggest that that the website is a complete rendering of the book and the
> > for-sale version makes a worthwhile contribution to the author and the
> > community.
>
> Jeff,
>
>    Downloading the site as a .zip file and reading the README.md tells us
> that pandoc is required. This is a format converter, apparently based on
> Haskell given the large number of dependencies to build it. But, pandoc will
> convert from markdown to LaTeX. I don't know the exact procedure as I've not
> yet taken the time to install all dependencies to pandoc and build it. The
> pandoc website has documentation.
>
> Regards,
>
> Rich
>
> ______________________________________________
> [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
> and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.

______________________________________________
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Re: Fwd: Learning advanced R

Albrecht Kauffmann-2
I've found the solution to compile the adv-r-book from source: After doing some settings (see:
https://travis-ci.org/hadley/adv-r/jobs/353347080/config )
and installation of netlify-cli, the command-line is:
Rscript -e 'bookdown::render_book("index.Rmd","bookdown::pdf_book")'

This works fine. Thank you for all hints!

Best, Albrecht

--
  Albrecht Kauffmann
  [hidden email]

Am Mi, 14. Mär 2018, um 19:24, schrieb Albrecht Kauffmann:

> I've found two problems in interpreting adv-r-master/book/build-book.r:
>
> 1. All pathes in build-book.r refer to the starting-directory "adv-r-
> master". However, the script build-book.r is located in the directory
> "book", which is located in directory "adv-r-master". Therefore, pathes
> starting at "." are wrong (should start at "..").
>
> 2. Some file names have endings "Rmd", but e.g. in the line "chapters <-
> dir(".", pattern = "\\.rmd$")"  these endings are named "rmd".
> Therefore, the files (e.g. "base-types.Rmd") cannot be found.
>
> Pandoc I have installed. Maybe there will arise further problems, but
> still I am experimenting with pathes.
>
> Best,
> Albrecht
>
> --
>   Albrecht Kauffmann
>   [hidden email]
>
> Am Mi, 14. Mär 2018, um 18:56, schrieb Rich Shepard:
> > On Wed, 14 Mar 2018, Jeff Newmiller wrote:
> >
> > > Nothing you have said tells me you have LaTeX working (a binary install of
> > > R does not depend on it), but if you actually know it is installed and
> > > available to R then that isn't the problem. Since you have not said what
> > > you actually did or what errors you encountered I can only shrug and
> > > suggest that that the website is a complete rendering of the book and the
> > > for-sale version makes a worthwhile contribution to the author and the
> > > community.
> >
> > Jeff,
> >
> >    Downloading the site as a .zip file and reading the README.md tells us
> > that pandoc is required. This is a format converter, apparently based on
> > Haskell given the large number of dependencies to build it. But, pandoc will
> > convert from markdown to LaTeX. I don't know the exact procedure as I've not
> > yet taken the time to install all dependencies to pandoc and build it. The
> > pandoc website has documentation.
> >
> > Regards,
> >
> > Rich
> >
> > ______________________________________________
> > [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
> > https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> > PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
> > and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
>
> ______________________________________________
> [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
> and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.

______________________________________________
[hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
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