application of R

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application of R

blazie
hello guys,

i am a petroleum engineering student and i will be having a long semester
break and currently i am learning THE R PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE just out of
interest. I would just like to know if i am able to design a business
analysis software using R as in create a type of software that can be sold
to business people. can this be done in R language?

another thing is if i do learn this all the way, what advantages will it
give me in terms of future prospects and career development?

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Re: application of R

Marc Schwartz-3


> On Jan 11, 2018, at 2:15 PM, muhammad ramzi <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> hello guys,
>
> i am a petroleum engineering student and i will be having a long semester
> break and currently i am learning THE R PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE just out of
> interest. I would just like to know if i am able to design a business
> analysis software using R as in create a type of software that can be sold
> to business people. can this be done in R language?
>
> another thing is if i do learn this all the way, what advantages will it
> give me in terms of future prospects and career development?


Hi,

To your first question, as R is open source and released under the GPL, there are legal issues that you will need to consider, which will be specific to the details of your plans, how your "application" is built, how it interacts with R, and importantly, the copying and distribution of the end product.

You should, first and foremost, contact a lawyer familiar with open source software, specifically GPL compatible licenses, so that you can get proper legal advice, which you will not get here. You risk legal/financial liabilities down the road if not done in compliance with the license requirements.

As a first pass, you should read:

  https://cran.r-project.org/doc/FAQ/R-FAQ.html#Can-I-use-R-for-commercial-purposes_003f

and

  https://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/gpl-2.0-faq.html

so that you can gain initial insights into some of the general implications of building a product for distribution (whether you give it away or sell it) that depends upon a GPL licensed application.

Whether or not there is utility for the application you envision such that people would be willing to pay for it, will depend upon a variety of factors, not the least of which is what competition you face and the value of your planned application over others that are already in the marketplace.

To your second question, you are asking a biased, self selected audience. Thus, take that into account for any responses that you may get.

The responses relative to advantages are going to be, to some extent, broadly industry specific. That being said, in many domains, knowing R, along with other relevant applications and programming languages can only be beneficial in many cases.

R is becoming increasingly popular (e.g. see: https://www.tiobe.com/tiobe-index/). However, depending upon the subject matter domain you will work in and to a large extent, the company or institution you will work for, those factors can have a material influence on the role that R might play in that environment.

Others can perhaps chime in with other thoughts and perhaps even industry specific insights for you.

Regards,

Marc Schwartz

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Re: application of R

blazie
Thank you very much this really helped me a lot .
So actually why would people learn R(other than personal interests ) if you can't really build anything that can be sold ? I'm sorry if I'm asking bad questions


> On 12 Jan 2018, at 4:43 AM, Marc Schwartz <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>
>
>> On Jan 11, 2018, at 2:15 PM, muhammad ramzi <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> hello guys,
>>
>> i am a petroleum engineering student and i will be having a long semester
>> break and currently i am learning THE R PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE just out of
>> interest. I would just like to know if i am able to design a business
>> analysis software using R as in create a type of software that can be sold
>> to business people. can this be done in R language?
>>
>> another thing is if i do learn this all the way, what advantages will it
>> give me in terms of future prospects and career development?
>
>
> Hi,
>
> To your first question, as R is open source and released under the GPL, there are legal issues that you will need to consider, which will be specific to the details of your plans, how your "application" is built, how it interacts with R, and importantly, the copying and distribution of the end product.
>
> You should, first and foremost, contact a lawyer familiar with open source software, specifically GPL compatible licenses, so that you can get proper legal advice, which you will not get here. You risk legal/financial liabilities down the road if not done in compliance with the license requirements.
>
> As a first pass, you should read:
>
>  https://cran.r-project.org/doc/FAQ/R-FAQ.html#Can-I-use-R-for-commercial-purposes_003f
>
> and
>
>  https://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/gpl-2.0-faq.html
>
> so that you can gain initial insights into some of the general implications of building a product for distribution (whether you give it away or sell it) that depends upon a GPL licensed application.
>
> Whether or not there is utility for the application you envision such that people would be willing to pay for it, will depend upon a variety of factors, not the least of which is what competition you face and the value of your planned application over others that are already in the marketplace.
>
> To your second question, you are asking a biased, self selected audience. Thus, take that into account for any responses that you may get.
>
> The responses relative to advantages are going to be, to some extent, broadly industry specific. That being said, in many domains, knowing R, along with other relevant applications and programming languages can only be beneficial in many cases.
>
> R is becoming increasingly popular (e.g. see: https://www.tiobe.com/tiobe-index/). However, depending upon the subject matter domain you will work in and to a large extent, the company or institution you will work for, those factors can have a material influence on the role that R might play in that environment.
>
> Others can perhaps chime in with other thoughts and perhaps even industry specific insights for you.
>
> Regards,
>
> Marc Schwartz
>

______________________________________________
[hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
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Re: application of R

Jeff Newmiller
Because many technical people need to accomplish statistical data analysis with computers that depend on existing algorithms applied in new ways, or with new algorithms that are not implemented by commercial software.  Often such people have no desire to provide step-by-step support of their tools for every user of their code indefinitely, so developing commercial software for others is less useful to them than having access to existing software that can be adapted. They often find that allowing others access to their code is a reasonable trade for being able to re-use the work of others before them.

You might read the book "The Cathedral and the Bazaar" for more detail about this perspective, but this line of discussion is not really on topic here.
--
Sent from my phone. Please excuse my brevity.

On January 11, 2018 7:09:20 PM PST, muhammad ramzi <[hidden email]> wrote:

>Thank you very much this really helped me a lot .
>So actually why would people learn R(other than personal interests ) if
>you can't really build anything that can be sold ? I'm sorry if I'm
>asking bad questions
>
>
>> On 12 Jan 2018, at 4:43 AM, Marc Schwartz <[hidden email]>
>wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Jan 11, 2018, at 2:15 PM, muhammad ramzi <[hidden email]>
>wrote:
>>>
>>> hello guys,
>>>
>>> i am a petroleum engineering student and i will be having a long
>semester
>>> break and currently i am learning THE R PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE just
>out of
>>> interest. I would just like to know if i am able to design a
>business
>>> analysis software using R as in create a type of software that can
>be sold
>>> to business people. can this be done in R language?
>>>
>>> another thing is if i do learn this all the way, what advantages
>will it
>>> give me in terms of future prospects and career development?
>>
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> To your first question, as R is open source and released under the
>GPL, there are legal issues that you will need to consider, which will
>be specific to the details of your plans, how your "application" is
>built, how it interacts with R, and importantly, the copying and
>distribution of the end product.
>>
>> You should, first and foremost, contact a lawyer familiar with open
>source software, specifically GPL compatible licenses, so that you can
>get proper legal advice, which you will not get here. You risk
>legal/financial liabilities down the road if not done in compliance
>with the license requirements.
>>
>> As a first pass, you should read:
>>
>>
>https://cran.r-project.org/doc/FAQ/R-FAQ.html#Can-I-use-R-for-commercial-purposes_003f
>>
>> and
>>
>>  https://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/gpl-2.0-faq.html
>>
>> so that you can gain initial insights into some of the general
>implications of building a product for distribution (whether you give
>it away or sell it) that depends upon a GPL licensed application.
>>
>> Whether or not there is utility for the application you envision such
>that people would be willing to pay for it, will depend upon a variety
>of factors, not the least of which is what competition you face and the
>value of your planned application over others that are already in the
>marketplace.
>>
>> To your second question, you are asking a biased, self selected
>audience. Thus, take that into account for any responses that you may
>get.
>>
>> The responses relative to advantages are going to be, to some extent,
>broadly industry specific. That being said, in many domains, knowing R,
>along with other relevant applications and programming languages can
>only be beneficial in many cases.
>>
>> R is becoming increasingly popular (e.g. see:
>https://www.tiobe.com/tiobe-index/). However, depending upon the
>subject matter domain you will work in and to a large extent, the
>company or institution you will work for, those factors can have a
>material influence on the role that R might play in that environment.
>>
>> Others can perhaps chime in with other thoughts and perhaps even
>industry specific insights for you.
>>
>> Regards,
>>
>> Marc Schwartz
>>
>
>______________________________________________
>[hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
>https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
>PLEASE do read the posting guide
>http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
>and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.

______________________________________________
[hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
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Re: application of R

blazie
Oh I see thank you very much now I understand. So for me as I am considered an intermediate in R and also C++ what kind of programming language I could take up and learn to make a commercial statistical software ? Any advices as well ?

> On 12 Jan 2018, at 12:40 PM, Jeff Newmiller <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Because many technical people need to accomplish statistical data analysis with computers that depend on existing algorithms applied in new ways, or with new algorithms that are not implemented by commercial software.  Often such people have no desire to provide step-by-step support of their tools for every user of their code indefinitely, so developing commercial software for others is less useful to them than having access to existing software that can be adapted. They often find that allowing others access to their code is a reasonable trade for being able to re-use the work of others before them.
>
> You might read the book "The Cathedral and the Bazaar" for more detail about this perspective, but this line of discussion is not really on topic here.
> --
> Sent from my phone. Please excuse my brevity.
>
>> On January 11, 2018 7:09:20 PM PST, muhammad ramzi <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Thank you very much this really helped me a lot .
>> So actually why would people learn R(other than personal interests ) if
>> you can't really build anything that can be sold ? I'm sorry if I'm
>> asking bad questions
>>
>>
>>> On 12 Jan 2018, at 4:43 AM, Marc Schwartz <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> On Jan 11, 2018, at 2:15 PM, muhammad ramzi <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> hello guys,
>>>>
>>>> i am a petroleum engineering student and i will be having a long
>> semester
>>>> break and currently i am learning THE R PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE just
>> out of
>>>> interest. I would just like to know if i am able to design a
>> business
>>>> analysis software using R as in create a type of software that can
>> be sold
>>>> to business people. can this be done in R language?
>>>>
>>>> another thing is if i do learn this all the way, what advantages
>> will it
>>>> give me in terms of future prospects and career development?
>>>
>>>
>>> Hi,
>>>
>>> To your first question, as R is open source and released under the
>> GPL, there are legal issues that you will need to consider, which will
>> be specific to the details of your plans, how your "application" is
>> built, how it interacts with R, and importantly, the copying and
>> distribution of the end product.
>>>
>>> You should, first and foremost, contact a lawyer familiar with open
>> source software, specifically GPL compatible licenses, so that you can
>> get proper legal advice, which you will not get here. You risk
>> legal/financial liabilities down the road if not done in compliance
>> with the license requirements.
>>>
>>> As a first pass, you should read:
>>>
>>>
>> https://cran.r-project.org/doc/FAQ/R-FAQ.html#Can-I-use-R-for-commercial-purposes_003f
>>>
>>> and
>>>
>>> https://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/gpl-2.0-faq.html
>>>
>>> so that you can gain initial insights into some of the general
>> implications of building a product for distribution (whether you give
>> it away or sell it) that depends upon a GPL licensed application.
>>>
>>> Whether or not there is utility for the application you envision such
>> that people would be willing to pay for it, will depend upon a variety
>> of factors, not the least of which is what competition you face and the
>> value of your planned application over others that are already in the
>> marketplace.
>>>
>>> To your second question, you are asking a biased, self selected
>> audience. Thus, take that into account for any responses that you may
>> get.
>>>
>>> The responses relative to advantages are going to be, to some extent,
>> broadly industry specific. That being said, in many domains, knowing R,
>> along with other relevant applications and programming languages can
>> only be beneficial in many cases.
>>>
>>> R is becoming increasingly popular (e.g. see:
>> https://www.tiobe.com/tiobe-index/). However, depending upon the
>> subject matter domain you will work in and to a large extent, the
>> company or institution you will work for, those factors can have a
>> material influence on the role that R might play in that environment.
>>>
>>> Others can perhaps chime in with other thoughts and perhaps even
>> industry specific insights for you.
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>>
>>> Marc Schwartz
>>>
>>
>> ______________________________________________
>> [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
>> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
>> PLEASE do read the posting guide
>> http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
>> and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.

______________________________________________
[hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
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Re: application of R

Eric Berger
In reply to this post by Jeff Newmiller
Marc and Jeff give excellent advice. Since you have a commercial
perspective, here are two more points to consider:
1. There are companies that sell software built on R. For example, the
company Rstudio.com develops both free and "professional" versions of its
products RStudio and Shiny.
2. You ask about selling software. Switch hats and think about buying
software. Some real-world problems can be solved using commercial products
such as Matlab (which costs thousands of dollars.) For some of these
problems, the world of R (and more generally CRAN - the Comprehensive R
Archive Network - https://cran.r-project.org/ - where you can find many of
the freely available R-packages) is a great alternative and it is free.

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 6:40 AM, Jeff Newmiller <[hidden email]>
wrote:

> Because many technical people need to accomplish statistical data analysis
> with computers that depend on existing algorithms applied in new ways, or
> with new algorithms that are not implemented by commercial software.  Often
> such people have no desire to provide step-by-step support of their tools
> for every user of their code indefinitely, so developing commercial
> software for others is less useful to them than having access to existing
> software that can be adapted. They often find that allowing others access
> to their code is a reasonable trade for being able to re-use the work of
> others before them.
>
> You might read the book "The Cathedral and the Bazaar" for more detail
> about this perspective, but this line of discussion is not really on topic
> here.
> --
> Sent from my phone. Please excuse my brevity.
>
> On January 11, 2018 7:09:20 PM PST, muhammad ramzi <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
> >Thank you very much this really helped me a lot .
> >So actually why would people learn R(other than personal interests ) if
> >you can't really build anything that can be sold ? I'm sorry if I'm
> >asking bad questions
> >
> >
> >> On 12 Jan 2018, at 4:43 AM, Marc Schwartz <[hidden email]>
> >wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>> On Jan 11, 2018, at 2:15 PM, muhammad ramzi <[hidden email]>
> >wrote:
> >>>
> >>> hello guys,
> >>>
> >>> i am a petroleum engineering student and i will be having a long
> >semester
> >>> break and currently i am learning THE R PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE just
> >out of
> >>> interest. I would just like to know if i am able to design a
> >business
> >>> analysis software using R as in create a type of software that can
> >be sold
> >>> to business people. can this be done in R language?
> >>>
> >>> another thing is if i do learn this all the way, what advantages
> >will it
> >>> give me in terms of future prospects and career development?
> >>
> >>
> >> Hi,
> >>
> >> To your first question, as R is open source and released under the
> >GPL, there are legal issues that you will need to consider, which will
> >be specific to the details of your plans, how your "application" is
> >built, how it interacts with R, and importantly, the copying and
> >distribution of the end product.
> >>
> >> You should, first and foremost, contact a lawyer familiar with open
> >source software, specifically GPL compatible licenses, so that you can
> >get proper legal advice, which you will not get here. You risk
> >legal/financial liabilities down the road if not done in compliance
> >with the license requirements.
> >>
> >> As a first pass, you should read:
> >>
> >>
> >https://cran.r-project.org/doc/FAQ/R-FAQ.html#Can-I-use-
> R-for-commercial-purposes_003f
> >>
> >> and
> >>
> >>  https://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/gpl-2.0-faq.html
> >>
> >> so that you can gain initial insights into some of the general
> >implications of building a product for distribution (whether you give
> >it away or sell it) that depends upon a GPL licensed application.
> >>
> >> Whether or not there is utility for the application you envision such
> >that people would be willing to pay for it, will depend upon a variety
> >of factors, not the least of which is what competition you face and the
> >value of your planned application over others that are already in the
> >marketplace.
> >>
> >> To your second question, you are asking a biased, self selected
> >audience. Thus, take that into account for any responses that you may
> >get.
> >>
> >> The responses relative to advantages are going to be, to some extent,
> >broadly industry specific. That being said, in many domains, knowing R,
> >along with other relevant applications and programming languages can
> >only be beneficial in many cases.
> >>
> >> R is becoming increasingly popular (e.g. see:
> >https://www.tiobe.com/tiobe-index/). However, depending upon the
> >subject matter domain you will work in and to a large extent, the
> >company or institution you will work for, those factors can have a
> >material influence on the role that R might play in that environment.
> >>
> >> Others can perhaps chime in with other thoughts and perhaps even
> >industry specific insights for you.
> >>
> >> Regards,
> >>
> >> Marc Schwartz
> >>
> >
> >______________________________________________
> >[hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
> >https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> >PLEASE do read the posting guide
> >http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
> >and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
>
> ______________________________________________
> [hidden email] mailing list -- To UNSUBSCRIBE and more, see
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/
> posting-guide.html
> and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
>

        [[alternative HTML version deleted]]

______________________________________________
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Re: application of R

Berend Hasselman
In reply to this post by blazie

> On 12 Jan 2018, at 04:09, muhammad ramzi <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Thank you very much this really helped me a lot .
> So actually why would people learn R(other than personal interests ) if you can't really build anything that can be sold ? I'm sorry if I'm asking bad questions
>


Google with the phrase "opensource why"  and start reading.

Berend Hasselman

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Re: application of R

Peter Dalgaard-2
In reply to this post by blazie
In the (approximate) words of Ross Ihaka: R could have been made commercial and then it might have had like 500 users instead of millions.

Programming language aside, there isn't really much of a market for new, closed source, statistical programs, at least not unless you get to a level of sophistication which is way beyond the capacity of any single person (e.g. in the field of maths software, Mathematica is not likely to be replaceable by a free alternative anytime soon, but that is huge!).

More likely, there is a market in consulting and in-house application development, both of which can quite conveniently be done with R. If you are good at it, that is.

-pd

> On 12 Jan 2018, at 06:17 , muhammad ramzi <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Oh I see thank you very much now I understand. So for me as I am considered an intermediate in R and also C++ what kind of programming language I could take up and learn to make a commercial statistical software ? Any advices as well ?

--
Peter Dalgaard, Professor,
Center for Statistics, Copenhagen Business School
Solbjerg Plads 3, 2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark
Phone: (+45)38153501
Office: A 4.23
Email: [hidden email]  Priv: [hidden email]

______________________________________________
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and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.