how to get the row name?

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how to get the row name?

Leaf Sun
Hi R-listers,

I have a simple question about a data frame.  

I sorted a data set by one of the variable in some condition (eg. X>=0),  the followed is part of the achieved. I was wondering how can I get the row name, i. e.   (1202,  2077 , 2328,  3341,...  ) and save them as a vector.     Thanks!

                          Tag  Species     X     Y Dbh3 Recr4 mort slope elevation aspect    SA   SR     dist1     dist2     dist3
1202    19103     316 856.0 430.3   21     4    1  9.87    151.42  60.08 25.38 1.02 0.2236068 0.7211103 1.3601471
2077    29893     316 935.4 482.7   28     4    1  5.66    137.28  13.86 25.14 1.01 0.6403124 0.8944272 1.0630146
2328    32989     316 910.7 301.5   12     4    1  8.07    137.69  86.16 25.26 1.01 0.3000000 1.2806248 1.3038405
3341    45198     316 975.2   2.4  144     4    1  2.95    121.10 173.60  0.00 0.00 0.5656854 1.2727922 1.3416408
...

Regards,

Leaf


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Re: how to get the row name?

Chuck Cleland
rownames(subset(mydata, X >=0))

?rownames

Leaf Sun wrote:

> Hi R-listers,
>
> I have a simple question about a data frame.  
>
> I sorted a data set by one of the variable in some condition (eg. X>=0),  the followed is part of the achieved. I was wondering how can I get the row name, i. e.   (1202,  2077 , 2328,  3341,...  ) and save them as a vector.     Thanks!
>
>  Tag  Species     X     Y Dbh3 Recr4 mort slope elevation aspect    SA   SR     dist1     dist2     dist3
> 1202    19103     316 856.0 430.3   21     4    1  9.87    151.42  60.08 25.38 1.02 0.2236068 0.7211103 1.3601471
> 2077    29893     316 935.4 482.7   28     4    1  5.66    137.28  13.86 25.14 1.01 0.6403124 0.8944272 1.0630146
> 2328    32989     316 910.7 301.5   12     4    1  8.07    137.69  86.16 25.26 1.01 0.3000000 1.2806248 1.3038405
> 3341    45198     316 975.2   2.4  144     4    1  2.95    121.10 173.60  0.00 0.00 0.5656854 1.2727922 1.3416408
> ...
>
> Regards,
>
> Leaf
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> ______________________________________________
> [hidden email] mailing list
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> PLEASE do read the posting guide! http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
--
Chuck Cleland, Ph.D.
NDRI, Inc.
71 West 23rd Street, 8th floor
New York, NY 10010
tel: (212) 845-4495 (Tu, Th)
tel: (732) 452-1424 (M, W, F)
fax: (917) 438-0894


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Glossay of available R functions

Alexandre Aguiar
Em Seg 30 Jan 2006 18:36, Chuck Cleland escreveu:
> rownames(subset(mydata, X >=0))

Hi,

I am new to R and read this list to learn. It is amazing how frequently new  
functions pop in messages. Useful and timesaving functions like subset
(above) must be documented somewhere.

Is there a glossary of functions?

--

          Alexandre Santos Aguiar, MD
- independent consultant for health research -
       R Botucatu, 591 cj 81 - 04037-005
            São Paulo - SP - Brazil
             tel +55-11-9320-2046
             fax +55-11-5549-8760
            www.spsconsultoria.com

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Re: how to get the row name?

Ionut Florescu
In reply to this post by Chuck Cleland
I don't know about rownames but
x >= 0 gives you a vector of logical values True and false.
If then you do
c(1:length(x)) [x>=0]
this gives the positions where the true happened, meaning your vector of
values.



Chuck Cleland wrote:

> rownames(subset(mydata, X >=0))
>
> ?rownames
>
> Leaf Sun wrote:
>  
>> Hi R-listers,
>>
>> I have a simple question about a data frame.  
>>
>> I sorted a data set by one of the variable in some condition (eg. X>=0),  the followed is part of the achieved. I was wondering how can I get the row name, i. e.   (1202,  2077 , 2328,  3341,...  ) and save them as a vector.     Thanks!
>>
>>  Tag  Species     X     Y Dbh3 Recr4 mort slope elevation aspect    SA   SR     dist1     dist2     dist3
>> 1202    19103     316 856.0 430.3   21     4    1  9.87    151.42  60.08 25.38 1.02 0.2236068 0.7211103 1.3601471
>> 2077    29893     316 935.4 482.7   28     4    1  5.66    137.28  13.86 25.14 1.01 0.6403124 0.8944272 1.0630146
>> 2328    32989     316 910.7 301.5   12     4    1  8.07    137.69  86.16 25.26 1.01 0.3000000 1.2806248 1.3038405
>> 3341    45198     316 975.2   2.4  144     4    1  2.95    121.10 173.60  0.00 0.00 0.5656854 1.2727922 1.3416408
>> ...
>>
>> Regards,
>>
>> Leaf
>>
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> ______________________________________________
>> [hidden email] mailing list
>> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
>> PLEASE do read the posting guide! http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
>>    
>
>  
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> ______________________________________________
> [hidden email] mailing list
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> PLEASE do read the posting guide! http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html

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Re: Glossay of available R functions

Chuck Cleland
In reply to this post by Alexandre Aguiar
I am not sure what you mean by a glossary, but subset and rownames are
both in the R Reference Index:

http://cran.r-project.org/doc/manuals/fullrefman.pdf

If you suspect there might be an R function for something but don't know
what it is, help.search() can be useful.  For example:

help.search("row names")

Alexandre Santos Aguiar wrote:

> Em Seg 30 Jan 2006 18:36, Chuck Cleland escreveu:
>> rownames(subset(mydata, X >=0))
>
> Hi,
>
> I am new to R and read this list to learn. It is amazing how frequently new  
> functions pop in messages. Useful and timesaving functions like subset
> (above) must be documented somewhere.
>
> Is there a glossary of functions?
>

--
Chuck Cleland, Ph.D.
NDRI, Inc.
71 West 23rd Street, 8th floor
New York, NY 10010
tel: (212) 845-4495 (Tu, Th)
tel: (732) 452-1424 (M, W, F)
fax: (917) 438-0894

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Re: how to get the row name?

Antonio, Fabio Di Narzo
In reply to this post by Ionut Florescu
2006/1/30, Ionut Florescu <[hidden email]>:
>
> I don't know about rownames but
> x >= 0 gives you a vector of logical values True and false.
> If then you do
> c(1:length(x)) [x>=0]
> this gives the positions where the true happened, meaning your vector of
> values.


But also returns NA's, if present in 'X'. If you're really interested in
indices of matched condition, consider using 'which':
which(mydata$X>=0)
Anyway, if you're really interested in rownames instead of numerical
indices, you have various options. For example:
rownames(mydata)[which(mydata$X>=0)]
or, more compactly, as Chuck Cleland has suggested:
rownames(subset(mydata, X >=0))


Antonio, Fabio Di Narzo.

> Chuck Cleland wrote:
> > rownames(subset(mydata, X >=0))
> >
> > ?rownames
> >
> > Leaf Sun wrote:
> >
> >> Hi R-listers,
> >>
> >> I have a simple question about a data frame.
> >>
> >> I sorted a data set by one of the variable in some condition (eg.
> X>=0),  the followed is part of the achieved. I was wondering how can I get
> the row name, i. e.   (1202,  2077 , 2328,  3341,...  ) and save them as a
> vector.     Thanks!
> >>
> >>                        Tag  Species     X     Y Dbh3 Recr4 mort slope
> elevation aspect    SA   SR     dist1     dist2     dist3
> >> 1202    19103     316 856.0 430.3   21     4    1  9.87    151.42
> 60.08 25.38 1.02 0.2236068 0.7211103 1.3601471
> >> 2077    29893     316 935.4 482.7   28     4    1  5.66    137.28
> 13.86 25.14 1.01 0.6403124 0.8944272 1.0630146
> >> 2328    32989     316 910.7 301.5   12     4    1  8.07    137.69
> 86.16 25.26 1.01 0.3000000 1.2806248 1.3038405
> >> 3341    45198     316 975.2   2.4  144     4    1  2.95    121.10
> 173.60  0.00 0.00 0.5656854 1.2727922 1.3416408
> >> ...
> >>
> >> Regards,
> >>
> >> Leaf
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>
> >> ______________________________________________
> >> [hidden email] mailing list
> >> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> >> PLEASE do read the posting guide!
> http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
> >>
> >
> >
> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > ______________________________________________
> > [hidden email] mailing list
> > https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> > PLEASE do read the posting guide!
> http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
>
>
>
> ______________________________________________
> [hidden email] mailing list
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> PLEASE do read the posting guide!
> http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
>
>

        [[alternative HTML version deleted]]

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Re: Glossay of available R functions

Patricia Hawkins
In reply to this post by Alexandre Aguiar
>>>>> "ASA" == Alexandre Santos Aguiar <[hidden email]> writes:

ASA> I am new to R and read this list to learn. It is amazing how
ASA> frequently new functions pop in messages. Useful and timesaving
ASA> functions like subset (above) must be documented somewhere.

ASA> Is there a glossary of functions?

I'm also new to R, and was wondering the same thing.  Took a bunch of
tries, but if you run start.help() and then choose Packages, then
Base, you will get the list of functions.

As a newcomer, I hesitate to suggest this, but maybe there should be a
comment on the index page to that effect?

--
Patricia J. Hawkins
Hawkins Internet Applications
www.hawkinsia.com

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Re: Glossay of available R functions

Brian Ripley
On Mon, 30 Jan 2006, Patricia J. Hawkins wrote:

>>>>>> "ASA" == Alexandre Santos Aguiar <[hidden email]> writes:
>
> ASA> I am new to R and read this list to learn. It is amazing how
> ASA> frequently new functions pop in messages. Useful and timesaving
> ASA> functions like subset (above) must be documented somewhere.
>
> ASA> Is there a glossary of functions?
>
> I'm also new to R, and was wondering the same thing.  Took a bunch of
> tries, but if you run start.help() and then choose Packages, then
> Base, you will get the list of functions.

You get a list of objects (not just functions) in the base package.  You
can also get a list by library(help=base).

However, that is far from all the functions available in base R.
As a quick check

as.matrix(sapply(search(), function(x) length(ls(x, all=TRUE))))

.GlobalEnv           0
package:methods    299
package:stats      497
package:graphics    79
package:grDevices   78
package:utils      152
package:datasets   103
Autoloads            1
package:base      1090

so it is less than half the objects loaded and visible in a default
session.  And there are another 18 packages shipped with R.

Looking at a list of 2300 objects is daunting, and so we provide
search facilities (including via the HTML pages).

> As a newcomer, I hesitate to suggest this, but maybe there should be a
> comment on the index page to that effect?

Which index page?  If you mean that given by help.start(), it is not a
common request, and search is linked from there.

--
Brian D. Ripley,                  [hidden email]
Professor of Applied Statistics,  http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/~ripley/
University of Oxford,             Tel:  +44 1865 272861 (self)
1 South Parks Road,                     +44 1865 272866 (PA)
Oxford OX1 3TG, UK                Fax:  +44 1865 272595

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Re: Glossay of available R functions

Christos Hatzis
Patricia,

If I understand correctly what you need, this is already available through
the main help page.  If you type help.start() to get to the html help, then
follow the link "Packages".  This will give you an index of all available
packages installed on your system (base + contributed).  Clicking on any of
the package names will give you a list of available functions in that
package.  This is a nice way to present a categorized index of several
thousand functions.  An additional advantage is that this index will be
updated if you install more packages on your system.

Hope this helps.

Christos Hatzis
Nuvera Biosciences, Inc.
400 West Cummings Park
Suite 2850
Woburn, MA 01801
Tel: 781-938-3830
www.nuverabio.com
 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Prof Brian Ripley
Sent: Tuesday, January 31, 2006 3:10 AM
To: Patricia J. Hawkins
Cc: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [R] Glossay of available R functions

On Mon, 30 Jan 2006, Patricia J. Hawkins wrote:

>>>>>> "ASA" == Alexandre Santos Aguiar <[hidden email]>
writes:

>
> ASA> I am new to R and read this list to learn. It is amazing how
> ASA> frequently new functions pop in messages. Useful and timesaving
> ASA> functions like subset (above) must be documented somewhere.
>
> ASA> Is there a glossary of functions?
>
> I'm also new to R, and was wondering the same thing.  Took a bunch of
> tries, but if you run start.help() and then choose Packages, then
> Base, you will get the list of functions.

You get a list of objects (not just functions) in the base package.  You can
also get a list by library(help=base).

However, that is far from all the functions available in base R.
As a quick check

as.matrix(sapply(search(), function(x) length(ls(x, all=TRUE))))

.GlobalEnv           0
package:methods    299
package:stats      497
package:graphics    79
package:grDevices   78
package:utils      152
package:datasets   103
Autoloads            1
package:base      1090

so it is less than half the objects loaded and visible in a default session.
And there are another 18 packages shipped with R.

Looking at a list of 2300 objects is daunting, and so we provide search
facilities (including via the HTML pages).

> As a newcomer, I hesitate to suggest this, but maybe there should be a
> comment on the index page to that effect?

Which index page?  If you mean that given by help.start(), it is not a
common request, and search is linked from there.

--
Brian D. Ripley,                  [hidden email]
Professor of Applied Statistics,  http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/~ripley/
University of Oxford,             Tel:  +44 1865 272861 (self)
1 South Parks Road,                     +44 1865 272866 (PA)
Oxford OX1 3TG, UK                Fax:  +44 1865 272595

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Re: Glossay of available R functions

Jonathan Baron
In addition, the search page at

http://finzi.psych.upenn.edu

can search all functions of all CRAN packages.

This is also available through

RSiteSearch(string,restrict="functions").

See the help page for RSiteSearch.

Jon
--
Jonathan Baron, Professor of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania
Home page: http://www.sas.upenn.edu/~baron

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Re: Glossay of available R functions

Patricia Hawkins
>>>>> "JB" == Jonathan Baron <[hidden email]> writes:

JB> In addition, the search page at
JB> http://finzi.psych.upenn.edu

JB> can search all functions of all CRAN packages.

JB> This is also available through

JB> RSiteSearch(string,restrict="functions").

Thank you all!  In fact, what I was looking for was just the glossary
of objects in the base package; the effective equivalent of the Python
Standard Library, or for C, Harbison & Steele's _C, A Reference Manual_.

I assume that's what the original poster wanted too, since he was
commenting that subset was new to him, though he did say "list of
functions in R".  I'd searched through everything _else_ in the help
system looking for such a glossary; I hadn't thought to look under
*Packages*, as those are, of course, add-ons.

So a comment such as "For an index of R basic objects, see the 'base'
package under *Packages*" on the help.start() index page would be
helpful.   Also perhaps a link from the Language Reference Manual,
since that's where I looked first.

By the way, in general the documentation and help facilities are
stellar.

--
Patricia J. Hawkins
Hawkins Internet Applications
www.hawkinsia.com

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Re: Glossay of available R functions

Brian Ripley
On Thu, 2 Feb 2006, Patricia J. Hawkins wrote:

>>>>>> "JB" == Jonathan Baron <[hidden email]> writes:
>
> JB> In addition, the search page at
> JB> http://finzi.psych.upenn.edu
>
> JB> can search all functions of all CRAN packages.
>
> JB> This is also available through
>
> JB> RSiteSearch(string,restrict="functions").
>
> Thank you all!  In fact, what I was looking for was just the glossary
> of objects in the base package; the effective equivalent of the Python
> Standard Library, or for C, Harbison & Steele's _C, A Reference Manual_.

Those are misleading analogies (not least because C has an ISO standard
giving all the functions/macros you can expect to find in C). It is like
saying you want to know about libc and not libm, despite the latter being
described in the ISO standard and in Harbison & Steele.

> I assume that's what the original poster wanted too, since he was

I would assume other people were able to express themselves accurately.

> commenting that subset was new to him, though he did say "list of
> functions in R".  I'd searched through everything _else_ in the help
> system looking for such a glossary; I hadn't thought to look under
> *Packages*, as those are, of course, add-ons.

`Of course' is incorrect here.  Everything in R is in a package.

> So a comment such as "For an index of R basic objects, see the 'base'
> package under *Packages*" on the help.start() index page would be
> helpful.

But (as I originally pointed out), that is not a correct interpretation of
`basic'.  It might have been in R 1.8.0, but the 'base' package is now
intended to support only some scripting operations (where speed is
essential so it is minimal).  Unlike Python, R is not primarily a
scripting language.

The analogue of the Python Standard Library is I think the standard
packages.

>   Also perhaps a link from the Language Reference Manual,
> since that's where I looked first.
>
> By the way, in general the documentation and help facilities are
> stellar.
>
> --
> Patricia J. Hawkins
> Hawkins Internet Applications
> www.hawkinsia.com
>
>

--
Brian D. Ripley,                  [hidden email]
Professor of Applied Statistics,  http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/~ripley/
University of Oxford,             Tel:  +44 1865 272861 (self)
1 South Parks Road,                     +44 1865 272866 (PA)
Oxford OX1 3TG, UK                Fax:  +44 1865 272595

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Re: Glossay of available R functions

stevenmh
In reply to this post by Patricia Hawkins
Hi Patricia and Alexandre,
Start R help, and select the Search Engine & Keywords link. This will  
take you to a page where keywords (including functions) are arranged  
by topic. It includes base and "recommended" packages. Also not that  
on the CRAN website (and mirrors) is a link for Task Views. There,  
packages are grouped by topic.
Hank
On Jan 30, 2006, at 6:38 PM, Patricia J. Hawkins wrote:

>>>>>> "ASA" == Alexandre Santos Aguiar <[hidden email]>  
>>>>>> writes:
>
> ASA> I am new to R and read this list to learn. It is amazing how
> ASA> frequently new functions pop in messages. Useful and timesaving
> ASA> functions like subset (above) must be documented somewhere.
>
> ASA> Is there a glossary of functions?
>
> I'm also new to R, and was wondering the same thing.  Took a bunch of
> tries, but if you run start.help() and then choose Packages, then
> Base, you will get the list of functions.
>
> As a newcomer, I hesitate to suggest this, but maybe there should be a
> comment on the index page to that effect?
>
> --
> Patricia J. Hawkins
> Hawkins Internet Applications
> www.hawkinsia.com
>
> ______________________________________________
> [hidden email] mailing list
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> PLEASE do read the posting guide! http://www.R-project.org/posting- 
> guide.html

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Re: Glossay of available R functions

Jim Porzak
In reply to this post by Patricia Hawkins
Alexandre & Patricia,

As Bert Gunter periodically points out:
"Newbies (and others!) may find useful the R Reference Card made available by
Tom Short and Rpad at http://www.rpad.org/Rpad/Rpad-refcard.pdf  or through
the "Contributed" link on CRAN (where some other reference cards are also
linked). It categorizes and organizes a bunch of R's basic, most used
functions so that they can be easily found. For example, paste() is under
the "Strings" heading and expand.grid() is under "Data Creation." For
newbies struggling to find the right R function as well as veterans who
can't quite remember the function name, it's very handy."

I still keep a hard copy of Tom Short's referncece card handy, as do
most of my colleagues at Loyalty Matrix.

--
HTH,
Jim Porzak
Loyalty Matrix Inc.
San Francisco, CA

On 1/30/06, Patricia J. Hawkins <[hidden email]> wrote:

> >>>>> "ASA" == Alexandre Santos Aguiar <[hidden email]> writes:
>
> ASA> I am new to R and read this list to learn. It is amazing how
> ASA> frequently new functions pop in messages. Useful and timesaving
> ASA> functions like subset (above) must be documented somewhere.
>
> ASA> Is there a glossary of functions?
>
> I'm also new to R, and was wondering the same thing.  Took a bunch of
> tries, but if you run start.help() and then choose Packages, then
> Base, you will get the list of functions.
>
> As a newcomer, I hesitate to suggest this, but maybe there should be a
> comment on the index page to that effect?
>
> --
> Patricia J. Hawkins
> Hawkins Internet Applications
> www.hawkinsia.com
>
> ______________________________________________
> [hidden email] mailing list
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> PLEASE do read the posting guide! http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
>

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Re: Glossay of available R functions

Patricia Hawkins
In reply to this post by Brian Ripley
>>>>> "PBR" == Prof Brian Ripley <[hidden email]> writes:

>> commenting that subset was new to him, though he did say "list of
>> functions in R".  I'd searched through everything _else_ in the help
>> system looking for such a glossary; I hadn't thought to look under
>> *Packages*, as those are, of course, add-ons.

PBR> `Of course' is incorrect here.  Everything in R is in a package.

Just my thinking at the time; once I realized that everything in R is
a package, it occurred to me to look under the "packages" heading.
But that was after reading the R Language Reference Manual, and
working through a good bit of the Introduction To R.

>> So a comment such as "For an index of R basic objects, see the
>> 'base' package under *Packages*" on the help.start() index page
>> would be helpful.

PBR> But (as I originally pointed out), that is not a correct
PBR> interpretation of `basic'.  It might have been in R 1.8.0, but
PBR> the 'base' package is now intended to support only some scripting
PBR> operations (where speed is essential so it is minimal).  Unlike
PBR> Python, R is not primarily a scripting language.

Oh -- I understand; thank you.  In retrospect, I was looking for the
things clueless (or cluefull) newcomers should be familiar with before
coming and bothering R-help with clueless newcomer questions.

I didn't mean to try your patience -- just to suggest a couple of
links in the documentation so that well-written information that
exists, and that *ought* to hit newcomers like a brick, would in fact
hit us like a brick.

PBR> The analogue of the Python Standard Library is I think the
PBR> standard packages.

Thank you!  That's helpful.

--
Patricia J. Hawkins
Hawkins Internet Applications
www.hawkinsia.com
"blundering through software language manuals since 1979"

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Re: Glossay of available R functions

Patricia Hawkins
In reply to this post by Jim Porzak

>>>>> "MHHS" == Martin Henry H Stevens <[hidden email]> writes:

MHHS> Start R help, and select the Search Engine & Keywords link. This
MHHS> will take you to a page where keywords (including functions) are
MHHS> arranged by topic. It includes base and "recommended"
MHHS> packages. Also not that on the CRAN website (and mirrors) is a
MHHS> link for Task Views. There, packages are grouped by topic.

Thank you, that's useful.

>>>>> "JP" == Jim Porzak <[hidden email]> writes:

JP> Alexandre & Patricia,
JP> As Bert Gunter periodically points out:

JP> "Newbies (and others!) may find useful the R Reference Card made available by
JP> Tom Short and Rpad at http://www.rpad.org/Rpad/Rpad-refcard.pdf  or through
JP> the "Contributed" link on CRAN (where some other reference cards are also
JP> linked)
....

JP> I still keep a hard copy of Tom Short's referncece card handy, as do
JP> most of my colleagues at Loyalty Matrix.

Got it!  Thank you, very handy.

--
Patricia J. Hawkins
Hawkins Internet Applications
www.hawkinsia.com

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