SAS VS R - What type of analysis is better?

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SAS VS R - What type of analysis is better?

george r r programming
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Hello R users,

Let me cut to the chase - being a SAS user for almost 5 years I've wondered why there is a big hype around R. Aside from the standard arguments like "R is open source, R got good extensions, because it's a program language it gives you more freedom etc." I was more wondering, which types of analysis does R better and if so, which ones? For example, is R more suited for segmentation analysis, data description and summarization analysis, dependency analysis etc.

Through my experience I find that using a package like SAS is more user friendly because you only need to push some buttons to say. I am willing to learn the R programming language but first I really want to know which type of analysis are better suited in R so I can just focus me on those analysis and see if there is a big difference between the usage in SAS and in R. Thanks beforehand
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Re: SAS VS R - What type of analysis is better?

Frank Harrell
I can't think of an example where R does not work better than SAS except
for a few cases of mixed effects regression models and for processing
enormous datasets when the R user does not want to learn about the
latest R tools for large datasets.  I quit using SAS in 1991 (in favor
of S-Plus and transitioned to R around 2000) and have never looked back.
  Lately what has really made R powerful is its ability to interface
with other languages and especially the way it works in a reproducible
analysis/dynamic report document context.

Frank
--
Frank E Harrell Jr Professor and Chairman      School of Medicine
                    Department of Biostatistics Vanderbilt University

______________________________________________
[hidden email] mailing list
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PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
Frank Harrell
Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University
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Re: SAS VS R - What type of analysis is better?

Frede Aakmann Tøgersen-2
In reply to this post by george r r programming
Hi

SAS is famous for handling large data sets. For more than 10 years ago S+ introduced a module for large data sets. Never used it, more money for license for a poor research institute.

Today I have a laptop with 8 Gb. If that's not enough then the head nodes on our cluster has 64 Gb and some nodes 196 Gb.

But from time to time it could be an advantage to do some analysis using the laptop.

So my question is: which kind of functionality for large data sets do the R community offers?

Br.

Frede




Sendt fra Samsung mobil


-------- Oprindelig meddelelse --------
Fra: Frank Harrell
Dato:06/06/2014 14.43 (GMT+01:00)
Til: RHELP
Emne: Re: [R] SAS VS R - What type of analysis is better?

I can't think of an example where R does not work better than SAS except
for a few cases of mixed effects regression models and for processing
enormous datasets when the R user does not want to learn about the
latest R tools for large datasets.  I quit using SAS in 1991 (in favor
of S-Plus and transitioned to R around 2000) and have never looked back.
  Lately what has really made R powerful is its ability to interface
with other languages and especially the way it works in a reproducible
analysis/dynamic report document context.

Frank
--
Frank E Harrell Jr Professor and Chairman      School of Medicine
                    Department of Biostatistics Vanderbilt University

______________________________________________
[hidden email] mailing list
https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.

        [[alternative HTML version deleted]]

______________________________________________
[hidden email] mailing list
https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
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Re: SAS VS R - What type of analysis is better?

Bert Gunter
Please do your homework.

The place to start for questions like this is the CRAN Task Views
page, where you will find a High Performance Computing topic that
links here:

http://cran.r-project.org/web/views/HighPerformanceComputing.html

If nothing there suits, then re-post with details as to why not and
what you think you are looking for.

Cheers,
Bert

Bert Gunter
Genentech Nonclinical Biostatistics
(650) 467-7374

"Data is not information. Information is not knowledge. And knowledge
is certainly not wisdom."
H. Gilbert Welch




On Fri, Jun 6, 2014 at 6:21 AM, Frede Aakmann Tøgersen <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi
>
> SAS is famous for handling large data sets. For more than 10 years ago S+ introduced a module for large data sets. Never used it, more money for license for a poor research institute.
>
> Today I have a laptop with 8 Gb. If that's not enough then the head nodes on our cluster has 64 Gb and some nodes 196 Gb.
>
> But from time to time it could be an advantage to do some analysis using the laptop.
>
> So my question is: which kind of functionality for large data sets do the R community offers?
>
> Br.
>
> Frede
>
>
>
>
> Sendt fra Samsung mobil
>
>
> -------- Oprindelig meddelelse --------
> Fra: Frank Harrell
> Dato:06/06/2014 14.43 (GMT+01:00)
> Til: RHELP
> Emne: Re: [R] SAS VS R - What type of analysis is better?
>
> I can't think of an example where R does not work better than SAS except
> for a few cases of mixed effects regression models and for processing
> enormous datasets when the R user does not want to learn about the
> latest R tools for large datasets.  I quit using SAS in 1991 (in favor
> of S-Plus and transitioned to R around 2000) and have never looked back.
>   Lately what has really made R powerful is its ability to interface
> with other languages and especially the way it works in a reproducible
> analysis/dynamic report document context.
>
> Frank
> --
> Frank E Harrell Jr Professor and Chairman      School of Medicine
>                     Department of Biostatistics Vanderbilt University
>
> ______________________________________________
> [hidden email] mailing list
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
> and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.
>
>         [[alternative HTML version deleted]]
>
> ______________________________________________
> [hidden email] mailing list
> https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
> PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
> and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.

______________________________________________
[hidden email] mailing list
https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.